doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002749, August 17, 2018Skærmbillede 2018-09-07 kl. 11.19.47.png
Background
Poor quadriceps strength has been associated with poor outcome after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR).
Aim
This study aims to assess quadriceps strength, muscle inhibition, and hop test performance in professional soccer players after ACLR.
Who
15 professional soccer players (age 22.3 ± 3.1 years, body mass 81.0 ± 11.5 kg, and height 1.75 ± 0.1 m) who had undergone ACLR participated. Isometriceccentric, and concentric quadriceps strength was assessed, along with quadriceps inhibition and single and cross-over hop performance, at the time of return to full-time unrestricted play.
Result
In comparison with the uninjured leg, the ACLR leg demonstrated large significant (d ≥ 0.84, p < 0.01) deficits in isometriceccentric, and concentric quadriceps strength, quadriceps inhibition, and hop distance.
Over 80% of the players failed to exceed the limb symmetry criteria of ≥90% for strength tests, although 75% of the cohort passed the ≥90% criteria for hop tests.
The outcome from ACLR in professional soccer players who received full-time intensive rehabilitation has not previously been reported in detail.
Conclusion
There were significant deficits in quadriceps strength at the time of return to sport, whereas hop testing, a commonly used outcome measure, failed to show the same levels of deficit. These deficits in quadriceps function may have implications for the development of ongoing knee symptoms and risk of future ACL injury.
Skærmbillede 2018-09-07 kl. 11.29.09.png